In Focus

WHAT I WISH I KNEW

KASSY DAVIS STAFF WRITER For most Pinewood high school students looking forward to college, it can be intimidating to think about transitioning from a small private school to a bigger college. Possibilities are endless at college — there are so many opportunities to pursue, people to meet, and places to go. But for most people that is the scary part. How do you make all that happen and still survive college? Madeline Augustine, Pinewood ’14, a current junior at Northeastern, believes that to make college as fun and memorable as possible, you must meet as many people as you can. “One of my regrets is hanging out with the same group of people the first few weeks and sticking with them all the time, because I quickly realized we had nothing in common,” Augustine said. Augustine explained that college is a big change, but also a momentous part of your life. Her advice is to take advantage of every opportunity you are provided with, such as making a substantial amount of new friends. Augustine also gives some comfort to the scary thought of not making friends by advising not to worry if you don’t get along with your roommate. “Not all people are instant BFF’s but you can still coexist,” Augustine said about her roommate whom she did not befriend immediately. Hannah Ditzler, Pinewood ’16, is a freshman at UC Santa Barbara, gives seniors the advice to be prepared for the difficulty of college. Ditzler expressed that she was taken by surprise by the rigor of college academics compared to high school. She advises against treating college classes, homework, and readings the same as high school. Although college seems like a very intimidating endeavor, Maddie Wheatley, a Pinewood graduate of the class of 2016 and a current freshman at BYU, says to not be so afraid because it is a chance for you to start over and be anyone you want to be. Wheatley advises to get to know your roommate beforehand because they want to get to know you just as much as you want to get to know them. She recommends asking them important questions that have to do with rooming habits — things like are they messy, clean, an early bird, a night owl, or workaholics. While small talk can be a gentle icebreaker, being honest can go a long way when it comes to establishing good communication with your roommate. She also offers comfort to people that are feeling like they’re having less fun than everyone else. “You don’t have to go out every night. It might seem like everyone is always doing something fun while you might be studying, but that’s because no one ever Snapchats and Instagrams when they’re just doing nothing in their room. You might think you’re the only one going through stuff sometimes but I promise you aren’t,” Wheatley said. So, to all you juniors and seniors worried about what the future holds for you in college, don’t worry because you will find your place and a way to get through it.

STAFF WRITER For most Pinewood high school students looking forward to college, it can be intimidating to think about transitioning from a small private school to a bigger college. Possibilities are endless at college — there are so many opportunities to pursue, people to meet, and places to go. But for most people that is the scary part. How do you make all that happen and still survive college? Madeline Augustine, Pinewood ’14, a current junior at Northeastern, believes that to make college as fun and memorable as possible, you must meet as many people as you can. “One of my regrets is hanging out with the same group of people the first few weeks and sticking with them all the time, because I quickly realized we had nothing in common,” Augustine said. Augustine explained that college is a big change, but also a momentous part of your life. Her advice is to take advantage of every opportunity you are provided with, such as making a substantial amount of new friends. Augustine also gives some comfort to the scary thought of not making friends by advising not to worry if you don’t get along with your roommate. “Not all people are instant BFF’s but you can still coexist,” Augustine said about her roommate whom she did not befriend immediately. Hannah Ditzler, Pinewood ’16, is a freshman at UC Santa Barbara, gives seniors the advice to be prepared for the difficulty of college. Ditzler expressed that she was taken by surprise by the rigor of college academics compared to high school. She advises against treating college classes, homework, and readings the same as high school. Although college seems like a very intimidating endeavor, Maddie Wheatley, a Pinewood graduate of the class of 2016 and a current freshman at BYU, says to not be so afraid because it is a chance for you to start over and be anyone you want to be. Wheatley advises to get to know your roommate beforehand because they want to get to know you just as much as you want to get to know them. She recommends asking them important questions that have to do with rooming habits — things like are they messy, clean, an early bird, a night owl, or workaholics. While small talk can be a gentle icebreaker, being honest can go a long way when it comes to establishing good communication with your roommate. She also offers comfort to people that are feeling like they’re having less fun than everyone else. “You don’t have to go out every night. It might seem like everyone is always doing something fun while you might be studying, but that’s because no one ever Snapchats and Instagrams when they’re just doing nothing in their room. You might think you’re the only one going through stuff sometimes but I promise you aren’t,” Wheatley said. So, to all you juniors and seniors worried about what the future holds for you in college, don’t worry because you will find your place and a way to get through it.

For most Pinewood high school students looking forward to college, it can be intimidating to think about transitioning from a small private school to a bigger college. Possibilities are endless at college — there are so many opportunities to pursue, people to meet, and places to go. But for most people that is the scary part. How do you make all that happen and still survive college? Madeline Augustine, Pinewood ’14, a current junior at Northeastern, believes that to make college as fun and memorable as possible, you must meet as many people as you can. “One of my regrets is hanging out with the same group of people the first few weeks and sticking with them all the time, because I quickly realized we had nothing in common,” Augustine said. Augustine explained that college is a big change, but also a momentous part of your life. Her advice is to take advantage of every opportunity you are provided with, such as making a substantial amount of new friends. Augustine also gives some comfort to the scary thought of not making friends by advising not to worry if you don’t get along with your roommate. “Not all people are instant BFF’s but you can still coexist,” Augustine said about her roommate whom she did not befriend immediately. Hannah Ditzler, Pinewood ’16, is a freshman at UC Santa Barbara, gives seniors the advice to be prepared for the difficulty of college. Ditzler expressed that she was taken by surprise by the rigor of college academics compared to high school. She advises against treating college classes, homework, and readings the same as high school. Although college seems like a very intimidating endeavor, Maddie Wheatley, a Pinewood graduate of the class of 2016 and a current freshman at BYU, says to not be so afraid because it is a chance for you to start over and be anyone you want to be. Wheatley advises to get to know your roommate beforehand because they want to get to know you just as much as you want to get to know them. She recommends asking them important questions that have to do with rooming habits — things like are they messy, clean, an early bird, a night owl, or workaholics. While small talk can be a gentle icebreaker, being honest can go a long way when it comes to establishing good communication with your roommate. She also offers comfort to people that are feeling like they’re having less fun than everyone else. “You don’t have to go out every night. It might seem like everyone is always doing something fun while you might be studying, but that’s because no one ever Snapchats and Instagrams when they’re just doing nothing in their room. You might think you’re the only one going through stuff sometimes but I promise you aren’t,” Wheatley said. So, to all you juniors and seniors worried about what the future holds for you in college, don’t worry because you will find your place and a way to get through it.

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